castle1
castle2
castle3
castle4
about me
Reflections
Surrealism
Hatchlings
Do you believe in magick?
My Lair
The Cavern
Tower of Twilight
Labyrinth
Vault
The Abyss
Guild
Hall
Portal
Dragons - fact and fiction
Faeries
Dungeon
Places of Wonder
Hoard




Old Soul

The Weyr

MIRACLES

(Latin miraculum, from mirari, "to wonder").

In general, a wonderful thing, the word being so used in classical Latin; in a specific sense, the Latin Vulgate designates by miracula wonders of a peculiar kind, expressed more clearly in the Greek text by the terms terata, dynameis, semeia, i.e., wonders performed by supernatural power as signs of some special mission or gift and explicitly ascribed to God.

The word terata literally means "wonders", in reference to feelings of amazement excited by their occurrence, hence effects produced in the material creation appealing to, and grasped by, the senses, usually by the sense of sight, at times by hearing. Thus, though the works of Divine grace, such as the Sacramental Presence, are above the power of nature, and due to God alone, they may be called miraculous only in the wide meaning of the term, i.e., as supernatural effects, but they are not miracles in the sense here understood, for miracles in the strict sense are apparent. The miracle falls under the grasp of the senses, either in the work itself or in its effects. The wonder of the miracle is due to the fact that its cause is hidden, and an effect is expected other than what actually takes place. Hence, by comparison with the ordinary course of things, the miracle is called extraordinary. In analyzing the difference between the extraordinary character of the miracle and the ordinary course of nature, the Fathers of the Church and theologians employ the terms above, contrary to, and outside nature. These terms express the manner in which the miracle is extraordinary.

A miracle is said to be above nature when the effect produced is above the native powers and forces in creatures of which the known laws of nature are the expression, as raising a dead man to life. Thus the effect in abundance far exceeds the power of natural forces, or it takes place instantaneously without the means or processes which nature employs.


BACK
HOME



Weyr Dragon



The Weyr | The Garden | F'Lessa | Hatchlings | Reflections | The Portal | Magic | The Lair | The Cavern | The Abyss | The Labyrinth | The Tower | The Vault | The Hall | The Guild | The Gallery | The Dungeon | The Hoard | Places of Wonder | Josh's Work |

Believe!
© Moon Light Princess